NEWS Story | 9-18 July 2022, Eilat, Israel

Red Sea's 'Super Corals' Prove Resistant Amid
Rising Ocean Temperatures

GETTY IMAGES

Despite sea temperatures rising faster in the Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba than the global average rate, the coral reef of the northernmost point of the Red Sea exhibit remarkable resistance and seem immune to the effects of global warming. Scientists are trying to understand the biological capacity of these corals to live at higher temperatures, hoping this knowledge could help reefs elsewhere in the world. The scientific community estimates that over 90% of reefs will die by 2050 due to climate change and direct human impact. The Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba corals might be one of the last remaining complete ecosystems by 2100. However, there's a glimmer of hope that this surviving coral reef could be used as a blueprint for an entirely new climate-resilient ecosystem.
Client - GETTY IMAGES
Photography - Lukasz Larsson Warzecha and Ulrika Larsson
Assignment Editors - Pancho Bernasconi, Jay Davies
Safety Diver - Ofir Hameiri
Special Thanks - Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences
PROJECT DELIVERABLES:
- photo story
EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 09: Beautifully formed Turbinaria at Eilat Coral Beach Nature Reserve.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
EArly morning light at Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences, Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Alex Chequer, research specialist and technical diver at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, prepare their closed circuit rebreather equipment ahead of a week of research diving led by Goodbody-Gringley and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, investigating corals adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[CLOCKWISE]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, performs a breath test of her closed circuit rebreather ahead of a deep decompression dive as part of a week of research diving led by Goodbody-Gringley and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, investigating corals adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Alex Chequer, research specialist and technical diver at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, prepares his closed circuit rebreather ahead of a week of research diving led by Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, investigating corals adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Divers walk down the beach wearing closed circuit rebreathers ahead of a deep decompression dive as part of a week of research diving led by Goodbody-Gringley and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, investigating corals adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: A coral watch health chart is prepared to be mounted to a photographic quadrant ahead of a dive as part of a week of research diving led by Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, investigating corals adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 12: Hagai Nativ [L], a marine biologist at the University of Haifa, assisted by Dr Jessica Bellworthy [R], Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, at 45 metres depth, takes a detailed photograph of corals on the sea bed using an underwater camera mounted to a quadrat. During a week of research diving led by Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, a team of divers took over 400 measurements between 5 and 45 metres as part of their mission to understand coral adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[CLOCKWISE]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 13: Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, at 15 metres depth, takes a measurement with FIRe (Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation) instrument, the latest in bio-optical technology measuring photosynthetic efficiency of different coral species. There are only three underwater instruments like that in the world. During a week of research diving led by Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Mass, a team of divers took over 400 measurements between 5 and 45 m deep as part of their mission to understand coral adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 12: Alex Chequer, research specialist and technical diver from the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, at 45 metres depth, takes a measurement using FIRe (Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation) instrument, the latest in bio-optical technology measuring photosynthetic efficiency of different coral species. There are only three underwater instruments like that in the world. During a week of research diving led by Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, a team of divers took over 400 measurements between 5 and 45 m deep as part of their mission to understand coral adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Beautiful carpet of different coral species at 45 metres depth on July 14, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the reef in Eilat is perhaps capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from human factors - tourism development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Spectacular Pterois miles, the devil firefish or common lionfish at 45 metres depth on July 14, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems providing habitat to many other animals. Although the coral reef in Eilat is seemingly capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 12: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, walks on a beach after a deep decompression dive as part of a week of research diving led by Dr Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley, the Director of Research at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute and Prof Tali Mass from the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, investigating corals adaptation to the depth gradient at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 18: Sunrise over the Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba on July 18, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. The Underwater Observatory Marine Park in Eilat with its easily recognisable tower and The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences building on the right.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 13: Young girl presses her hand against a glass window of The Underwater Observatory Marine Park in Eilat on July 13, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. The Underwater Observatory Marine Park Eilat, established in 1975 as the first of its kind in the world, is independent of The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences. The Underwater Marine Observatory gives the public a rare opportunity to observe the underwater world without getting wet. The coral reef surrounding the observatory is partially planted and cared for by a team of divers; however, the observatory is not bounded by a net enclosing fish.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)
[ABOVE - L]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 12: Young girl presses her hand against the glass window of The Underwater Observatory Marine Park in Eilat on July 12, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. The Underwater Observatory Marine Park Eilat, established in 1975 as the first of its kind in the world, is independent of the Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences. The Underwater Marine Observatory gives the public a rare opportunity to observe the underwater world without getting wet. The coral reef surrounding the observatory is partially planted and cared for by a team of divers; however, the observatory is not bounded by a net enclosing fish.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[ABOVE - R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 13: The Underwater Observatory Marine Park in Eilat on July 13, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. The Underwater Observatory Marine Park Eilat, established in 1975 as the first of its kind in the world, is independent of The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences. The Underwater MArine Observatory gives the public a rare opportunity to observe the underwater world without getting wet. The coral reef surrounding the observatory is partially planted and cared for by a team of divers; however, the observatory is not bounded by a net enclosing fish.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)
[TOP]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Ayala Porat, a PhD student at IUI, sets coral larvae net traps at ca. 6 metres depth to collect coral larvae in situ during a sunset dive. Divers return the following morning to collect the larvae collected in a jar at the top of the net at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Collected coral larvae are used in experiments assessing the environment's impact on development and survival in juvenile life phases.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[BOTTOM L-R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Ayala Porat, a PhD student at IUI, sets coral larvae net traps at ca. 6 metres depth to collect coral larvae in situ during a sunset dive. Divers return the following morning to collect the larvae collected in a jar at the top of the net at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Collected coral larvae are used in experiments assessing the environment's impact on development and survival in juvenile life phases.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Kerem Citak, an academic intern at IUI, sets coral larvae net traps at ca. 6 metres depth to collect coral larvae in situ during a sunset dive. Divers return the following morning to collect the larvae collected in a jar at the top of the net at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Collected coral larvae are used in experiments assessing the environment's impact on development and survival in juvenile life phases.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 11: Coral larvae net trap at ca. 6 metres depth left to collect coral larvae in situ during a sunset dive. Divers return the following morning to collect the larvae collected in a jar at the top of the net at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Collected coral larvae are used in experiments assessing the environment's impact on development and survival in juvenile life phases.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[TOP]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 12: Gil Lapid [L], a PhD student at IUI and Kerem Citak [R], an academic intern at IUI, prepare for an early morning dive to collect larvae traps set the evening before at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Collected coral larvae are used in experiments assessing the environment's impact on development and survival in juvenile life phases.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[BOTTOM L-R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 12: Dr Jessica Bellworthy [R], Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, the University of Haifa, assisted by Tamar Shifroni [L], a marine science student at the University of Haifa, receive larvae traps collected by divers Gil Lapid, PhD student at IUI and Kerem Citak, an academic intern at IUI, at the beach outside of The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Collected coral larvae are used in experiments assessing the environment's impact on development and survival in juvenile life phases.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 13: Full moon rises over the port of Aqaba, Jordan, seen from the Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat on July 13, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the coral reef in Eilat is seemingly capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[ABOVE - L]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 18: Pre-dawn light, looking North-East, over the heavily developed Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba on July 18, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Here the reef's most pristine and precious parts (bottom right corner of the frame) are right 'next door' to industrial structures. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[ABOVE - R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 17: North beach seafront after sunset in Eilat on July 17, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, during a short bounce dive to 40 metres depth, collected and settled two montha ago for an experiment aiming to assess the impact that environment can have upon development and survival of different coral species in juvenile life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[CLOCKWISE]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, moves collected coral samples onto a water table. These corals were collected as coral larvae two months ago from 40 meters depth and returned to the reef under different light conditions. Now developed into juvenile corals, they contribute to Bellworthy's experiment aiming to assess the impact of the environment on the physiology and survival of corals during early life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, moves collected coral samples onto a water table. These corals were collected as coral larvae two months ago from 40 meters depth and returned to the reef under different light conditions. Now developed into juvenile corals, they contribute to Bellworthy's experiment aiming to assess the impact of the environment on the physiology and survival of corals during early life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, moves collected coral samples onto a water table. These corals were collected as coral larvae two months ago from 40 meters depth and returned to the reef under different light conditions. Now developed into juvenile corals, they contribute to Bellworthy's experiment aiming to assess the impact of the environment on the physiology and survival of corals during early life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Ulrika Larsson/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, moves collected coral samples onto a water table. These corals were collected as coral larvae two months ago from 40 meters depth and returned to the reef under different light conditions. Now developed into juvenile corals, they contribute to Bellworthy's experiment aiming to assess the impact of the environment on the physiology and survival of corals during early life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[TOP]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, processes coral samples for DNA/RNA extraction. These samples were 'seeded' and 'planted' about a month ago at 40 metres depth for an experiment aiming to assess the impact that the environment can have on the development and survival of different coral species in juvenile life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[BOTTOM - L]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, processes coral samples for DNA/RNA extraction. These samples were 'seeded' and 'planted' about a month ago at 40 metres depth for an experiment aiming to assess the impact that the environment can have on the development and survival of different coral species in juvenile life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[BOTTOM - R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Dr Jessica Bellworthy, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, processes coral samples for a PAM (Pulse-Amplitude-Modulation) instrument test, measuring the proportion of photons used to drive the photosynthesis in the coral. These samples were 'seeded' and 'planted' about a month ago at 40 metres depth for an experiment aiming to assess the impact that the environment can have on the development and survival of different coral species in juvenile life phases at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[TOP - L/R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Naama-Rose Kochman, a PhD student at IUI, collects coral samples from the coral nursery at 6 metres depth, to be processed later in the lab at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[BOTTOM]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Prof Maoz Fine, Head, Laboratory for Coral Reef Ecology, Interuniversity Institute of Marine Science, performs general maintenance work of the first CMSI system, the first monitoring station installed in the Gulf of Aqaba and the Red Sea, and the world's first real-time, open data coral monitoring station. CMSI is an open access real-time data online database enabling researchers from around the globe to collaborate and advance the understanding of the effects of the environment on coral function and wellbeing. CMSI collects data on multiple environmental parameters - air and water temperature, wind speed and direction, light intensity at the sea's surface and underwater conditions, and coral physiological performance. Scientists plan to install more CMSI stations throughout the Red Sea in 2022.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 14: Beautifully formed Acropora coral at 5 metres depth in the Red Sea on July 14, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the reef in Eilat is perhaps capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from human factors - tourism development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[CLOCKWISE]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 16: Healthy coral reefs are one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth on July 16, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems providing habitat to many other animals. Although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 16: Swimmers, snorkelers and beach goers enjoy a swim at the Coral Beach Nature Reserve in Eilat on July 16, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 16: Healthy coral reefs are one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth on July 16, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems providing habitat to many other animals. Although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 16: Busy sea front at the North Beach in Eilat on July 16, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 16: Large coral reef debris lies on the sea bed at 3 metres depth, remains of an old reef damaged during an unseasonal storm, which hit Eilat on March 13, 2020, at the Coral Beach Nature Reserve in Eilat on July 16, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Coral reefs are complete ecosystems, and although the coral reef in Eilat is capable of withstanding climate change, it is also under threat from anthropogenic factors - large-scale development, waste run-offs into the sea and light pollution.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[CLOCKWISE]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 18: Chen Azulay, a PhD student at IUI, prepares a coral sample coral dissection. Azulay performs coral dissection bi-monthly to measure the size of coral eggs and hormone levels to understand coral's reproduction cycle better. These samples were collected from the coral nursery at 6 metres depth, to be processed later in the lab at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 18: Chen Azulay, a PhD student at IUI, performs under a microscope a coral dissection. Azulay performs coral dissection bi-monthly to measure the size of coral eggs and hormone levels to understand coral's reproduction cycle better. These samples were collected from the coral nursery at 6 metres depth, to be processed later in the lab at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
[TOP]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 17: Portrait of a coral - Turbinaria on July 17, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Photographed in one of the tanks of the Red Sea Simulator at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 result in a lowering of pH conditions and an increase in ocean temperature. The RSS (Red Sea Simulator) was designed to examine future ocean conditions' effect on coral reefs.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

[BOTTOM L-R]

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 17: Portrait of a coral - Acropora on July 17, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Photographed in one of the tanks of the Red Sea Simulator at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 result in a lowering of pH conditions and an increase in temperature in the oceans. The RSS (Red Sea Simulator) was designed to examine future ocean conditions' effect on coral reefs.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 17: Portrait of a coral - Dipsastraea/Favia on July 17, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Photographed in one of the tanks of the Red Sea Simulator at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 result in a lowering of pH conditions and an increase in temperature in the oceans. The RSS (Red Sea Simulator) was designed to examine future ocean conditions' effect on coral reefs.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)

  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 17: Portrait of a coral - Acropora on July 17, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Photographed in one of the tanks of the Red Sea Simulator at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 result in a lowering of pH conditions and an increase in temperature in the oceans. The RSS (Red Sea Simulator) was designed to examine future ocean conditions' effect on coral reefs.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)
  • EILAT, ISRAEL - JULY 17: Portrait of a coral - Pocillopora on July 17, 2022, in Eilat, Israel. Photographed in one of the tanks of the Red Sea Simulator at The Interuniversity Institute (IUI) for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 result in a lowering of pH conditions and an increase in temperature in the oceans. The RSS (Red Sea Simulator) was designed to examine future ocean conditions' effect on coral reefs.
(Photo by Lukasz Larsson Warzecha/Getty Images)